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This Halloween, the creepiest event to attend might be a mass online social experiment hosted by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. MIT is famous for churning out some of the world’s top engineers, programmers, and scientists.   But the university’s Media Laboratory is increasingly known for launching experimental projects in October that are
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For years, a mystery puzzled environmental scientists. The world had banned the use of many ozone-depleting compounds in 2010. So why were global emission levels still so high?   The picture started to clear up in June. That’s when The New York Times published an investigation into the issue.  China, the paper claimed, was to blame for these mystery emissions. Now it
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An awful lot can happen in any given week, and it’s no easy task keeping up with all the excitement – both in the world of science and beyond. To keep you up to date with our coverage at ScienceAlert, each week we put together this shareable image with some of the past week’s highlights.
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On February 11th, 2016, scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) made history when they announced the first detection of gravitational waves.   Originally predicted made by Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity a century prior, these waves are essentially ripples in space-time that are formed by major astronomical events – such as the merger
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Mars is a sizable planet about nine times the mass of our moon. The latest scientific research suggests Mars, despite looking like a giant desert, may harbour enough subsurface water and warmth to support microbial life today.   But against the deep, dark backdrop of space, the rusty-red world looks as humble and insignificant as Earth. NASA underscored this stark reality
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Strange-looking black pouches have been washing up on beaches along North Carolina’s shores. But despite how they might look, they’re not plastic pollution, as officials have reminded the well-meaning public.   That’s because they’re actually something much cooler – the egg casings of sea skates. Sometimes known as mermaid’s or devil’s purses, based on their
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Scientists have previously suspected supermassive black holes can merge together, and have seen signs of these cosmic collisions on a smaller scale. Now new research backs up the hypothesis – and shows evidence that it could be happening all across the Universe.   Astronomers studying detailed radio maps of jet sources – powerful beams of
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More than eight decades after they were predicted to exist, physicists have found evidence of discrete units of matter that could help us better understand the electrical equivalent of ferromagnetism.   Called hysterons, these nano-scaled stacks of molecules act like independent particles in a crowd, solving a long standing mystery while laying the groundwork for
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Amazon welcomed visitors into its headquarters over the weekend to see a rare corpse flower named Morticia in bloom. The 6-foot-tall (182-centimetre-tall) plant, which is technically called a “titan arum”, sits in the rainforest inside of the Spheres on Amazon’s Seattle campus.   The Spheres opened earlier this year, and they’re intended to serve as
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Humans are a scared bunch. Everything from spiders, to blood and guts can set us off, as Halloween every year reminds us. But in 2018 what are Americans most afraid of? Well, move over spiders and snakes – a new survey suggests we’re way more scared of the bigger picture issues like government corruption, the
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A deep-sea swimming sea cucumber, Enypniastes eximia, also known as a headless chicken monster, has been filmed for the first time in Southern Ocean waters off East Antarctica using underwater camera technology developed by Australian researchers.   The creature, which has only been filmed before in the Gulf of Mexico, was discovered in 3 kilometres